Dr Holly Data: all about allergic reactions…

Last Update: July 31, 2019 at 12:25 pm

 

Date:  July 31, 2019

 

Source:  NFTS

 

 

Dr Holly Data: all about allergic reactions…

noon pacific:

TODAY:  All About Allergic Reactions …

Wednesdays at NOON PST  / 3PM EST – The Whole Health Initiative with Dr Holly   – An NFTS Global Luminary  broadcasting from Canada since March 2014 –   Dr Holly is a Doctor of Natural Medicine, a scientist, a professional speaker, an author of Cancer: Why what you don’t know about your treatment could harm you and 12 other books and a practitioner.  As a Doctor of Natural Medicine with 7 degrees & 3 designations in a wide range of healing modalities and 20 years experience, she can assist you in identifying and understanding your path to health. She can identify your underlying life themes, coping mechanisms, value systems and defense mechanisms to understanding the physiology and biochemistry and energy patterns of your body.  She has a mobile health clinic that comes to your door and can assess 1000s of variables in front of you AND create a protocol unique to you.  In addition, she provides consultation for physicians and clients around the world.

 

 

 

Most people have experienced some kind of allergic reactions during their lifetimes. They can be to foods, to the environment, to medications. They can be hugely reactive or just minor reactions. Always annoying.

But are you aware that there are different types of immune system responses to allergies? Let’s take a look and understand what is going on.

  • Type 1   Immediate hypersensitivity
  • Type 2   cytotoxic
  • Type 3   immune complex
  • Type 4   cell mediated

Okay, so that’s nice. But what does it mean?

Type 1 – Immediate reactions can be either localized or systemic – systemic means it goes throughout the body. The most common is the allergen connecting with a mast cell which then releases histamine. The histamine causes the symptoms that we are aware of and can cause tissue damage and even death. However, other compounds (like prostaglandins, leukotrienes, etc) may be released from other cells as well, (like basophils).

 

Type 1 reactions include:

  • Anaphylactic
  • Allergic asthma
  • Allergic conjunctivitis
  • Hay fever or allergic rhinitis
  • Atopic dermatitis or eczema
  • Urticaria or hives
  • eosinophilia

A systemic reaction is usually an anaphylactic reaction which can cause a variety of symptoms:

  • Itchy rash or hives
  • Watery eyes
  • Runny nose
  • Throat or tone swelling
  • Shortness of breath
  • Light headedness or fainting
  • Low blood pressure
  • Abdominal pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting

There can also be a second anaphylactic reaction or a biphasic reaction which can take up to 12 hours to occur after the initial reaction.

The most common causes of an anaphylactic reaction are:

Each time you have a anaphylactic reaction, the body responds more than the previous time. Thus people who have these reactions usually carry an Epi Pen. The Epi stands for epinephrine which is the pharmaceutical used to counteract the histamine. Other medications include anti-histamines and methylprednisolone, theophylline.

 

Type II Reactions

In this reaction the body’s natural antibodies attach to the cell surfaces (antigens), often our own RBCs; and activate an immune pathway that eliminates the foreign pathogen/cell complex.

Examples of Type II reactions include:

  • Transfusion reaction – obviously involves the blood
  • Graves disease (auto-immune disorder that affects the thyroid – most common cause of hyperthyroidism)
  • Myasthenia gravis (neuro muscular disorder that affects the face, eyes, swallowing)
  • Auto immune hemolytic anemia (immune system attacks our RBCs)

Type III Reactions are called the Immune Complex Hypersensitivity and involve ‘insoluble immune complexes’ that form in the blood and deposited into various tissues (often the skin and joints or kidneys). When the complex is deposited, it provokes an immune response that attempts to eliminate the foreign body. This can take hours to day to cause symptoms.

Symptoms include:

  • Tissue damage
  • Inflammatory response

Examples of Type III reactions include:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis (immune system attacks the joints)
  • Systemic lupus (immune system attacks various parts of the body: skin, muscles, bones, heart, lungs, etc)
  • Malaria (mosquito born infectious disease whereby the mosquito infects the person with parasites when it bites)

Type IV reactions are called cell mediated or delayed type hypersensitivity because it usually take 2-3 days for symptoms to appear. Rather than reacting to the a pathogenic antigen it is cell mediated. Specific types of immune cells called macrophages – think of cells running around gobbling up pathogenic material – and then secrete compounds that trigger the immune system.

Symptoms of Type IV reactions include:

  • Skin issues
  • Lungs issues
  • Pancreatic issues
  • Thyroid issues

Examples of Type IV reactions include:

  • Contact dermatitis like Poison ivy
  • TB
  • Leprosy
  • Transplant rejection
  • Coeliac disease
  • Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (gradual destruction of the thyroid gland)

So now you might ask what is the difference between a food allergy and a sensitivity?

  1. A food allergy causes an immune reaction
    1. Anaphylactic
    2. Hives
    3. Itching
    4. Swelling
  2. A food sensitivity causes a gut reaction
    1. Bloating
    2. Constipation
    3. Cramping
    4. Diarrhea
    5. Gas
  3. What might cause a reaction to food
    1. Insufficient enzymes
    2. Insufficient probiotics
    3. Sensitivity to various compounds like caffeine, sulfites, lectins, MSG, etc

So what can we do about all these different kinds of immune dysfunctions?

Well here comes to be compounds to the rescue:

  • Glutathione
  • Transfer factor

Glutathione helps to regulate the immune system.

  • In every cell of the body
  • Helps to regulate inflammation
  • Chelates toxins
  • Re-generates the blood brain barrier
  • Re-generates the gut lining
  • Hugely the best anti-oxidant
  • Regulates the balance between Th1 and Th2

 

Transfer factor helps to reprogram the immune system – especially in the gut.

 

Herbs like Urtica dioica are great for blocking the receptors on mast cells so that they don’t release histamine.

 

There is a lot we can do with the gut and the immune system to help restore health to the body. Make sure you find the right practitioner to work with.

 

Here’s to your health.

 

 

noon pacific:

TODAY:  All About Allergic Reactions …

Wednesdays at NOON PST  / 3PM EST – The Whole Health Initiative with Dr Holly   – An NFTS Global Luminary  broadcasting from Canada since March 2014 –   Dr Holly is a Doctor of Natural Medicine, a scientist, a professional speaker, an author of Cancer: Why what you don’t know about your treatment could harm you and 12 other books and a practitioner.  As a Doctor of Natural Medicine with 7 degrees & 3 designations in a wide range of healing modalities and 20 years experience, she can assist you in identifying and understanding your path to health. She can identify your underlying life themes, coping mechanisms, value systems and defense mechanisms to understanding the physiology and biochemistry and energy patterns of your body.  She has a mobile health clinic that comes to your door and can assess 1000s of variables in front of you AND create a protocol unique to you.  In addition, she provides consultation for physicians and clients around the world.