Medicinal herbs you can grow yourself.

Last Update: September 4, 2019 at 12:35 pm

SOURCE:  NFTS
DATE:  September 4, 2019

 

Medicinal herbs you can grow yourself.

 

By Dr Holly

 

Wednesdays at NOON PST  / 3PM EST – The Whole Health Initiative with Dr Holly  – An NFTS Global Luminary  broadcasting from Canada since March 2014 –   Dr Holly is a Doctor of Natural Medicine, a scientist, a professional speaker, an author of Cancer: Why what you don’t know about your treatment could harm you and 12 other books and a practitioner.  As a Doctor of Natural Medicine with 7 degrees & 3 designations in a wide range of healing modalities and 20 years experience, she can assist you in identifying and understanding your path to health. She can identify your underlying life themes, coping mechanisms, value systems and defense mechanisms to understanding the physiology and biochemistry and energy patterns of your body.  She has a mobile health clinic that comes to your door and can assess 1000s of variables in front of you AND create a protocol unique to you.  In addition, she provides consultation for physicians and clients around the world

We have talked several times, ok, umpteen times about the herbs and spices you can grow in your home, on your window sill, on your patio, or in the garden. We have talked about them from a nutritional perspective – how herbs and spices are far more nutrient dense than food, especially if grown yourself. Today we will take that topic and explore the medicinal value of those herbs and spices.

Sooo…what is easy to grow yourself; how to grow yourself; and what medicinal value they provide for you.

  • Basil – we have both basil and holy basil which is called the “King of Herbs” in some cultures and considerably stronger than basil; an annual unless very warm climates; starts out very small and takes a while to really grow
    1. Does best in well drained but moist soil – water when soil is dry to the touch and at the base, with a neutral pH; warm environments; loves the sun
    2. Anti-depressant, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-spasmodic, carminative/digestive, circulatory stimulant, nervine/sedative
    3. Both leaves and flowers are used in teas for upper respiratory issues like asthma, bronchitis, and sinusitis. Many use it for arthritic conditions. Basil is noted for its benefits with the gut: bowel inflammation; flatulence, decreased appetite, diarrhea/constipation, stomach-ache, vomiting and diabetes, as well as cuts and scrapes. Can be used in salads
    4. Nutrients include essential oils, beta carotenes, vit C, tannins
    5. Contraindications – none that I am aware of
  • Calendula – an annual from the Asteraceae/daisy family – although called marigold or pot marigold – the species we are referring to is not the garden flower which are in the Tagetes genus which are not medicinal
    1. Prefers the sun; easily grown from seed – seeds are cold tolerant; pick flowers every 2-3 days to provoke a longer growing season; does great in zones 8-10
    2. Anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory; stimulates the lymphatic system and menses; flowers are particularly antioxidant – make sure you include the green base of the flower – where most of the oils are stored
    3. Both petals and flowers are edible – can put in everything from omelettes to salads; used in topical creams and ointments; great for skin conditions ranging from diaper rash to burns and dry skin. Can also be taken internally
    4. Nutrients include iodine, manganese, potassium, saponins, carotenoids (yellow/orange/red fat soluble pigments called terpenoids – some are converted to Vit A; some are anti-inflammatory; some are beneficial to the immune system and some are cancer fighting), flavonoids, bitter, essential oils
    5. Contraindications – none that I am aware of
  • Cilantro – from the Apiaceae/parsley family. Cilantro refers to the fresh plant; coriander refers to the seeds and has a very different flavor; it grows from about 6-10 inches and will branch as you harvest starting about 50 days along; freezes well; or you can preserve it in oil and then freeze in ice cube trays
    1. From the Apiaceae family which contains over 3700 species including carrots and celery

Needs full sun in more northern areas; light shade in more southern areas- bolts quickly in hot weather; grows best in well drained but moist soils; make successive sowings every few weeks

  1. Antioxidant; anti-cancer; anti-inflammatory; anti-fungal; anti-microbial; helps cut down sodium levels; decreases risk of obesity/diabetes and heart disease; promotes healthy skin/hair; inc HDL and dec LDL; fights anemia; promotes liver health; I love it best for its chelation capacity along with  chlorella – the claim is that it can remove about 74% of aluminum; 87% of lead; 94% of mercury
  2. Use it in salads, soups and smoothies; to increase energy levels; improve skin health; improve digestion; the immune system; and mental performance
  3. Nutrients include flavonoids, essential oils, tannins, coumarin
  4. Contraindications – excessive use of coriander can have a narcotic effect
  • Feverfew – a perennial from the Asteraceae/daisy family
    1. Plant in full sun with drained or sandy soil; slightly acidic pH about 6-6.7; start indoors in the late winter; just sprinkle a few seeds in pot on an inch of soil; gently tap the pot to settle the seeds; spray when watering initially; place in a sunny window – germinates within 2 weeks
    2. Anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, cardiotonic, emmenagogue
    3. People use the flowers and leaves in a tea for headaches, including migraines, arthritis, irregular menstrual cycles and various skin conditions
    4. Nutrients include essential oils, tannins
    5. Contraindications – avoid during pregnancy and while nursing. it can diminish blood clotting capacity so not with blood thinners and not prior to surgery
  • Garlic – comes from the Alliaceae family along with chives, leeks, onions and shallots
    1. Planting a clove in the early spring (around March) or early fall (September to November) in mild climates; rich but well drained soils; cut flower stalks to keep energy in the bulb; the hardneck varieties are easier than the softneck varieties in colder climates; easier to grow in the ground than in containers; it stores well as long as it is kept warm and dry; helps repel aphids, and a variety of other garden pests
    2. The allicin compounds is claimed to stimulate circulation/vasodilator and consequently lowers blood pressure; anti-inflammatory, benefits the immune system; anti-microbial (bacterial/fungal/parasites),
    3. All parts of the garlic plant are edible, although most stick to the cloves. It can be used in a wide variety of ways when cooking, from chopping into salads and soups to meats, vegetables, breads and eggs, but to get the most medicinal benefit of garlic, smash and swallow
    4. Nutrients include over 350 compounds including 39 sulfuric compounds, Vit C, potassium, calcium, phosphorus
    5. Contraindications – excessive amounts can irritate the stomach/kidneys; don’t take with blood thinners; some people are allergic to garlic; avoid large amounts if pregnant or nursing
  • Lemon balm – from the mint or Lamiaceae/mint family; a perennial
    1. Start indoors 6-8 weeks before last frost – use sterilized potting soil and only minimally water; germination takes about 2 weeks; transplant outside between late March and mid – April. Likes the shade, especially during high midday sun; like a fertile, moist soil; pick leaves throughout the summer;
    2. Anti-bacterial (and against candida), anti-carcinogenic (especially with liver cells), anti-diabetic, anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmodic, antioxidant, cardio-tonic, fever-reducing, hypotensive, sedative
    3. Used for a variety of conditions including anxiety and insomnia, insect bites, herpes/cold sores, and an upset stomach/nausea/indigestion; reduces triglycerides and even improve cognitive function
    4. Nutrients include Vit C, calcium, magnesium, bitters, essential oils, flavonoids
    5. Contraindications – May interact with sedatives, thyroid medications
  • Mint – another perennial and again from the Lamiaceae/mint family; huge number of cross overs with mint – lots of flavors to choose from
    1. Plant indoors 8-10 weeks before last frost – ¼” deep in moist soil; or outside in April/May. Seeds should sprout in about 2 weeks; warm from the bottom to speed germination. Thrives in part shade and will spread vigorously. Plant in a container; trim regularly; pinch sprigs before flowering for maximum pungency. Repels aphids and flea beetles; don’t plant near parsley
    2. Analgesic (topically), anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, antioxidant, anti-spasmodic, carminative, digestive, immune stimulant, vasodilator,
    3. Mint has been used for IBS, gut motility, calms the smooth muscles, stomach/muscle cramps, earaches/headaches
    4. Nutrients include beta carotene, B-complex, Vit C, potassium, flavonoids, essential oils, ketones, tannins, menthol
    5. Contraindications – avoid use when cold/chills/yin deficiency or during gallstone attacks. If nursing avoid large amounts
  • Parsley – a biennial from the Apiaceae/parsley family
    1. A cold hardy plant; can start in sterilized seed starting mix in peat pots or plug trays; transplant into a deep bed; lots of rotted manure and compost; likes some shade; hardy to zone 5; can start winter crops in a sunny location in September; likes asparagus, carrots, chives, corn, onions, and tomatoes – not near mint!!!
    2. Facilitates the body’s use of oxygen; increases circulation to digestive tract;
    3. Leaf root and seed are all used. Used for issues like flatulence and bad breath; helps kidney function eliminate excess fluids and kidney stones. Leaves are used for anemia, arthritis, dysmenorrhea, gout and as a poultice for topical use with bruises, insect bites, sprains; or as a steam/lotion for dry skin;
    4. Nutrients include beta carotene, Vit C, B complex, essential oils, flavonoids, proteins, iron, histamine, magnesium
    5. Contraindicated with medications such as warfarin/coumadin (blood thinner/anti-clotting – large amounts of parsley could increase blood clotting); diuretics – parsley is a diuretic – so too much could dehydrate the body; aspirin might increase sensitivity to parsley if allergic to parsley – only ever reported once
  • Sage – sage actually means “to heal”. This reflects how it was initially used, long before it became a culinary herb. Another that comes from the Lamiaceae/mint family
    1. Easy but slow to grow. Likes the warm season and full sun; hardy to zone 5. Start indoors around February and transplant outside mid April. Sow seeds about 1/8” deep and keep soil moist not wet and warm the bottom. Sprouts in 2-3 weeks. Great for the vegetable gardens but not near cucumbers
    2. Anti-fungal, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiseptic, antispasmodic, bitter, carminative, circulatory stimulant, expectorant, nervine/calming, brain tonic
    3. Used for upper respiratory (thins mucosal membrane secretions) and has a drying effect; mouth sores, sore throat, sore gumes. As a carminative it helps with the digestion of fatty acids. It also can work with anxiety/depression, blood clots, diarrhea, skin issues, rheumatic pain, hair (oily scalp, dandruff, helps darken hair
    4. Nutrients include beta carotene, B1, B2, C, calcium, iron, magnesium, essential oils, flavonoids, tannins
    5. Contraindications – avoid large doses when pregnant and do not use therapeutically for prolonged periods of time. Seek professional guidance if you have high blood pressure, kidney disease or epilepsy.
  • Thyme – a perennial; a variety of different types; another from the Lamiaceae/mint family
    1. English thyme grows to about 12”; do well in containers; drought tolerant; slow growing. Start the fine seeds on the surface of moist sterilized seed starting mix under bright light with a warmed bottom if possible. Water minimally; when large enough transplant to garden or to pots; protect pots from the cold – damp cold soils will kill thyme
    2. Antihelmintic/worm; anti-microbial (bacterial/fungal), carminative (colic, indigestion, stomach-ache), decongestant, bronchial dilator; strengthens immune system
    3. Used for upper respiratory issues like coughs and congestion, sore throats, laryngitis, mouth sores; also used for gut issues like indigestion and gas;

Topically used to clean infections and increase circulation

  1. Nutrients include several B vitamins, C, chromium, manganese, essential oils, bitter, tannin, flavonoids
  2. Contraindications – only one I know is taking therapeutic dosages when pregnant

Okay – so now you have an idea of how simple it can be to plant and grow some easy herbs; what they can do for the body; and what nutrients they have.

Whether you have a windowsill; a small patio; a large veranda or a garden – you can grow the foods that help you keep your body healthy.

Make it a great day.

 

noon pacific:

TODAY:  Medicinal herbs you can grow yourself.

Wednesdays at NOON PST  / 3PM EST – The Whole Health Initiative with Dr Holly   – An NFTS Global Luminary  broadcasting from Canada since March 2014 –   Dr Holly is a Doctor of Natural Medicine, a scientist, a professional speaker, an author of Cancer: Why what you don’t know about your treatment could harm you and 12 other books and a practitioner.  As a Doctor of Natural Medicine with 7 degrees & 3 designations in a wide range of healing modalities and 20 years experience, she can assist you in identifying and understanding your path to health. She can identify your underlying life themes, coping mechanisms, value systems and defense mechanisms to understanding the physiology and biochemistry and energy patterns of your body.  She has a mobile health clinic that comes to your door and can assess 1000s of variables in front of you AND create a protocol unique to you.  In addition, she provides consultation for physicians and clients around the world